Patrick Jones Recordings

American Artist & Professor of Saxophone

NEW!
Patrick Jones: La Souplesse (Saxophone/Piano)
Available at Jeanné, Inc.

Compact disc recording of music for saxophone and piano featuring Patrick Jones (saxophone) and Kristine West Denton (piano). ©2015


• Guy Lacour: Hommage à Jacques Ibert (alto saxophone/piano)
• Eugene Bozza: Aria (alto saxophone/piano)
• Willy Bauweraerts: Trilogie (alto saxophone/piano)
• J.S. Bach (Patrick Jones): "Overture" from Orchestral Suite in B Minor (soprano saxophone/piano)
• Frank Martin: Ballade (alto saxophone/piano)
• Guy Lacour: Étude de Concert (alto saxophone)
• Giuseppe Verdi (Patrick Jones): "Caro Nome" from Rigoletto (alto saxophone/piano)


Patrick Jones has performed as a soloist, recitalist, and chamber musician around the world. As a featured soloist he has performed with the Grammy award-winning ensemble Imani Winds, Zagreb Saxophone Quartet, Erie Philharmonic, and Erie Chamber Orchestra. He is an active performer, educator, clinician, and Yamaha Performing Artist. Jones is currently an assistant professor of music at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania.


Kristine West Denton has performed across the country, in Canada, and Germany as a soloist and collaborative pianist. She was a long-time faculty member at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, where she collaborated often with Patrick Jones. She was a frequent concerto soloist with the Erie Philharmonic at Edinboro University and played keyboards for the Erie Philharmonic, Erie Chamber Orchestra and the Bemus Bay Pops Orchestra.

Short audio samples from La Souplesse

 

Selections from La Souplesse Program Notes by Richard Ingham. (www.saxingham.com)
Guy Lacour: Hommage à Jacques Ibert (alto saxophone/piano)
Guy Lacour’s Hommage à Jacques Ibert for alto saxophone and orchestra, or as here for saxophone and piano, was composed in 1972. The work is modeled on Ibert’s own Concertino da Camera, with some strong direct references (Ibert himself had written an Hommage à Mozart in 1957). Written for saxophonist Jean-Marie Londeix, the work is in two movements.*


Eugene Bozza: Aria (alto saxophone/piano)
Eugène Bozza (1905-1991) wrote his Aria for alto saxophone and piano in 1936 for saxophonist Marcel Mule and the music is inspired by the third movement aria from J.S.Bach's Pastorale in F BWV 590 for organ. The piano sets the scene with a gradually unfolding chord over a gently insistent pulse which continues through the entire piece. The saxophone line unfolds horizontally with beautifully balanced moments of repose and then movement. The piano bass line acts as a contrapuntal line to the saxophone with a contrasting rhythmic identity, and evolves under the right hand chords, whose colour, in contrast to the mesmeric pulse, is provided by chord additions and delicious suspensions. Some direct quotes from the Bach organ work appear in the saxophone line, and the whole is an exquisite equilibrium of large and small scale movement and relaxation.*


Willy Bauweraerts: Trilogie (alto saxophone/piano)
Belgian saxophonist and composer Willy Bauweraerts(b. 1956) studied in Antwerp, Rotterdam and London in classical, jazz and rock saxophone. He teaches saxophone at the Academies of Hoboken and Berchem, and writes music for television and many varied ensembles. Trilogie for alto saxophone and piano was written in 1997 and makes considerable use of extended saxophone techniques, in an admirably integrated musical way.*


J.S. Bach (Patrick Jones): "Overture" from Orchestral Suite in B Minor (soprano saxophone/piano)
J. S. Bach (1685-1750) wrote the Orchestral Suite No. 2 in B minor, BWV 1067 in the 1730s (probably after his orchestral suites 1, 3 and 4) and it may have been his last orchestral work. Patrick Jones' excellent and sensitive arrangement of the “Overture” gives the original flute part to the soprano saxophone. Some scholars argue that the second Orchestral Suite was originally for violin solo, others that it was for oboe. This leads today's saxophonists to feel justified in making extensive use of baroque material. Before 1800 a score was adjusted to fit the available orchestra; after this the orchestra was adjusted to fit the score.*


Frank Martin: Ballade (alto saxophone/piano)
Frank Martin (1890 -1974) wrote his Ballade for saxophone and orchestra in 1938. One of six Ballades written for solo instruments with piano or orchestra, the Ballade for saxophone was written for the saxophonist Sigurd Rascher. The form is almost that of a fantasy, and relates to the piano ballades that Chopin created; long dramatic works, inspired by heroic poetic ballads.*


Guy Lacour: Étude de Concert (alto saxophone)
Guy Lacour wrote his Étude de Concert in 1992. This relatively short recital piece for solo alto saxophone has a reflective opening, which gradually opens out into soaring song-like lines. The ensuing delicate conversation between registers identifies itself as perfect study material while also being ideal for the concert platform.*


Giuseppe Verdi (Patrick Jones): "Caro Nome" from Rigoletto (alto saxophone/piano)
Giuseppe Verdi (1813-1901) had been the most celebrated composer of Italian opera, and was, like Wagner at the same time, revolutionizing the concept of opera. One of only two formal arias in the opera (Rigoletto) is Caro Nome (Dear Name), which became among Verdi's most celebrated arias. The saxophone is considered to be an instrument with striking vocal characteristics, and in this arrangement Patrick Jones makes the instrument serve the music in a highly successful way. The elegance and poise of the aria is perfectly captured here. .


Patrick Jones has performed as a soloist, recitalist, and chamber musician around the world. As a featured soloist he has performed with the Grammy award-winning ensemble Imani Winds, Zagreb Saxophone Quartet, Erie Philharmonic, and Erie Chamber Orchestra. He is an active performer, educator, clinician, and Yamaha Performing Artist. Jones is currently an assistant professor of music at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania.

Kristine West Denton has performed across the country, in Canada, and Germany as a soloist and collaborative pianist. She was a long-time faculty member at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, where she collaborated often with Patrick Jones. She was a frequent concerto soloist with the Erie Philharmonic at Edinboro University and played keyboards for the Erie Philharmonic, Erie Chamber Orchestra and the Bemus Bay Pops Orchestra.